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    « Cray and Fernbach Awards | Main | A Few Thoughts on Programming »

    May 07, 2009

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    Jack K. Horner

    Well said. If there is a single large scientific code that was actually developed in accordance with good software engineering practices, it has to be the best kept secret on the planet.

    Les Hattons's classic ("The T Experiments: Errors In Scientific Software," Computing in Science and Engineering, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 27-38, Apr.-June 1997, doi:10.1109/99.609829) argues, by the way, that such codes produce, on average results that have at best *one* digit of precision.

    chris oneal

    Well done. Thanks. - Chris

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