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    « Doctoral Comedy: Which Way Is The Door? | Main | Escaping from Flatland »

    April 11, 2009

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    Dan Reed

    We are saying the same thing, just different terminology. I consider Cell a GPU. The principal parts in Roadrunner can be purchased separately with a consumer credit card. That's my definition of commodity.

    Dan

    LANLGuy

    Dan you say...
    "most of us were convinced that achieving petascale performance within a decade would require some new architectural approaches and custom designs, along with radically new system software ... We were wrong, ... We broke the petascale barrier in 2008 using commodity x86 microprocessors and GPUs, Infiniband interconnects, minimally modified Linux ..."

    Not exactly, I'd say the Roadrunner -- (the first petascale) computer at Los Alamos is pretty non-standard. For the record, the x86 microprocessors are a small (~1/20) percentage of the systems total processing power and it doesn't have any GPUs (IBM Cell processors,yes).

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